Salvador Dali’s Le Roy Soleil (1997)

© Victor Wong
© Victor Wong

While taking photos of this perfume bottle, I suddenly felt a little bit sad – look at the face on that cap! It looks like a sad puppy.

The fate of a discontinued perfume sometimes is like a pet waiting to be adopted. In this case, this bottle of Salvador Dali Le Roy Soleil (1997) has been sitting on the back of the shelf for nearly 17 years. I mean, give it one more year, it can vote for our Canadian prime minister.

The fate of a collector is often tragic too. A collector is the opposite of a monk. Never satisfied, always tempted; the joy of owning something hard to get lasts only a short moment. But let me tell you how happy I was when I found this 100ml bottle (yes, not a 50ml, not a 100ml without a box) at my local perfume store, at a normal retail price. The sales person in fact had never seen what the bottle looked like, and she said “wow” as she took it out of the box.

Really, the scent is almost unimportant. (Sorry, this is so wrong.) It’s important, and it smells like a peach cooler with a metallic dry down. Very nice.

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Salvador Dali’s Salvador Dali for Women (1985)

© Victor Wong
© Victor Wong

Sometimes a group hug is not enough; you need kisses from a pair of fat lips for consolation.

“Wow, you smell so nice!”
“Yeah, I just used some aldehyde as mouthwash”, the pair of fat lips replied.

Dali (1985) is unexpectedly floral, beautiful, and retro smelling. All the white flowers and yellow flowers are there, together with some warm oak moss, myrrh and musks for basenotes. Luca Turin gave it a 4/5 stars.

Salvador Dali’s Salvador (1992)

© Victor Wong
© Victor Wong

Continuing my new-found interest in Salvador Dali’s perfumes. The bottle of “Salvador” (1992) looks like the cross-section of an epidermis under a microscope, zoomed-in, looking at the amber fatty cells. Slightly disturbing, but I appreciate the effort they put in making this design unique.

The opening of Salvador is a disappointing “typical citrus cologne, again?” smell. But honestly, I shouldn’t get disappointed smelling a lime. Slowly, the middle and base notes start revealing themselves – carnation, rose, tonka beans (yeah baby), vanilla, leather, making it a yummy cologne, and also making Guerlain’s Tonka Imperiale look like an eunuch.

Gerard Anthony was the co-creator, his works include Azzaro and Balenciaga Pour Homme. (I will talk about this monster soon).

Salvador Dali Pour Homme (1985)

© Victor Wong
© Victor Wong

Salvador Dali has made so many perfumes since the 80’s, every time I visit a perfume shop I see a bunch of them on the shelves. Their weird looking bottles made me think that they were gimmicky and just trying to sell you the packaging. And of course, I remember reading Luca Turin’s reviews on most of their perfumes, on average each get a two out of five stars. Last week I re-read all his reviews on Salvador’s perfumes and realized that there were two or three perfumes that got a four-star rating.

Now Salvador Dail pour Homme didn’t get any review because it’s their debut perfume (1985) and it is discontinued. I wish Luca did a review on this one because it’s actually quite good. The surprise is that it was created by the current Guerlain CEO/Lead perfumer, Thierry Wasser almost 30 years ago. I guess he was in his twenties? A well thought out top to bottom note design, it is a very decent oriental fougere. The bottle is also one of a kind. I think it should be in every eclectic perfume collector’s collection.